Rock On

the-mine-mind:

Gotta get rid of more of these guys. :( Finances just ain’t comfortable right now.

Click the links to see more photos of these guys:

Aquamarine Beryl Crystals
Dioptase
Fluorite
Quartz and Epidote
Demantoid Garnet
Smokey Quartz and Spessartine Garnets on Feldspar
Grossular Garnets
If you’re in Ontario, pick-up is possible. Otherwise, I ship worldwide (e-mail me for a shipping quote!) All prices are in USD. Payment options are PayPal, cheque, money order, e-Transfer… basically anything but cash in the mail! :)

E-mail me at kailey@kaileylang.com if you want to grab any of these guys. First come, first serve.

bekkathyst:

bekkathyst:

Natural Gemstone Pendants by EnchantedCreativity on Etsy // Please do not remove text

Anything purchased today will include a free stone!

bekkathyst:

bekkathyst:

Amethyst crystal pendants $6 here.

Each one bought today will include a free stone!

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder
Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.
by Bec Crew
So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 
These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 
Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)
images: John Rakovan et al.

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder

Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.

by Bec Crew

So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 

These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 

Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)

images: John Rakovan et al.

mineralists:

Backlit specimen of Almandine Garnets in Graphite. Very cool!

mineralists:

Backlit specimen of Almandine Garnets in Graphite. Very cool!

This one is super exciting. Despite its pretty average appearance, this is our very own little bit of putnisite! That’s right, the platypus of the mineral world. The very same mineral that was just recently discovered, is now gracing our cabinet. It’s a very, very small specimen that’s more of a scientific joy than an aesthetic one. I circled in the magnified shot just where you could see the little cluster of purple. The entire stone is gently dusted with the crystals, though you really only see it under magnification.

The wandering aqua from before. A very pretty specimen. In the smaller crystal, you can see a sort of ‘helix’ effect in the light. A beautiful, very clear piece; I’m sure the vendor will be happy to have it back.

The wandering aqua from before. A very pretty specimen. In the smaller crystal, you can see a sort of ‘helix’ effect in the light. A beautiful, very clear piece; I’m sure the vendor will be happy to have it back.

The Tale of the Lost Aqua

Oh my god. We were refunded on an aquamarine a while back (we used the money to buy this one) after we thought that it was a scam since it wasn’t coming (not to mention the tracking info not working and customs having no idea what was going on…). We just got the package, after two months and the aforementioned refund. I can’t even begin to imagine the seller’s face when he thought that it was lost in the mail and he’d have to eat the cost. Hopefully it brightens his day a little when he gets it back.

After the queue runs out today, posts may be few and far between for a little while. It’s not going to be a hiatus- I’ll still be active, able to answer questions, etc. Due to limited funds thanks to sudden repairs, an unexpected doctor’s visit, and a ridiculous plumbing bill, I won’t be able to expand my collection for a little while. In the same vein, I should probably chill out because our cabinet is running out of space really fast. 

In the meantime, you can ask me any sort of questions you want, and I’ll do my best to answer them (even the weird ones). Thanks for being patient.

Tourmaline var. Elbaite (Indicolite) that’s likely from Afghanistan or Pakistan, but there’s no exact location information on it. I love aquamarine for how it looks like looking up at the light while under the sea. I love indicolite because it’s like looking down into the depths.