Rock On

bogglebabbles:

A few photos of the nature in my backyard. So happy to be taking photos again. 

I’ve started up a personal/diary/whatever sort of blog. For those interested, it’ll be photography, rants, general personal stuff, plus reblogging anything that I wouldn’t consider fit for my minerals blog.

So relieved to get back into photography. It’s like a breath of fresh air.

With some help from Husband and having realized I had a LOT more saved than I thought, I was able to afford a new camera! It’s currently coming in the mail. I was thinking about maybe going back and retaking a bunch of the collection once it gets here, if people are interested. Maybe make it a little more showy, since they’re already categorized for the most part.

I don’t know, I’m just so excited to have a new camera coming ahhhhhhhh.

I am so, so excited about these. Both wonderful pieces made by bekkathyst. The first is a sodalite bracelet and the second is this opal. The wire-wrapping is so sturdy! I was worried about the funky shape being a hindrance, but if it was, it certainly doesn’t show. Beautiful, amazing work. I’m still gushing.

EDIT: FORGOT TO MENTION! You can find her shop here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/EnchantedCreativity It updates pretty frequently, and if you have a stone, she does customs!

Wulfenite from Red Cloud Mine in Arizona. Some more splashes of orange coming through… Very nice crystal.

As you can see from these photos, my 6-year-old camera is on its last leg. It refuses to focus properly and the flash hasn’t been working for a long time now. I’m going to be saving up for a new one, but in the meantime, I have no reliable means of photographing the few other new additions. My only other option is my phone, which will have to do in the meantime. 

tristinleighhh:

this gorgeous piece of rainbow fluorite is just sooo lovely and amazing look at the layers god you could study this for hours. I want a slab of this soooooo bad I’d be so happy and centered. please fall into my hands one day. I’ll need both of them to hold it (:

tristinleighhh:

this gorgeous piece of rainbow fluorite is just sooo lovely and amazing look at the layers god you could study this for hours. I want a slab of this soooooo bad I’d be so happy and centered. please fall into my hands one day. I’ll need both of them to hold it (:

the-mine-mind:

Gotta get rid of more of these guys. :( Finances just ain’t comfortable right now.

Click the links to see more photos of these guys:

Aquamarine Beryl Crystals
Dioptase
Fluorite
Quartz and Epidote
Demantoid Garnet
Smokey Quartz and Spessartine Garnets on Feldspar
Grossular Garnets
If you’re in Ontario, pick-up is possible. Otherwise, I ship worldwide (e-mail me for a shipping quote!) All prices are in USD. Payment options are PayPal, cheque, money order, e-Transfer… basically anything but cash in the mail! :)

E-mail me at kailey@kaileylang.com if you want to grab any of these guys. First come, first serve.

bekkathyst:

bekkathyst:

Natural Gemstone Pendants by EnchantedCreativity on Etsy // Please do not remove text

Anything purchased today will include a free stone!

bekkathyst:

bekkathyst:

Amethyst crystal pendants $6 here.

Each one bought today will include a free stone!

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder
Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.
by Bec Crew
So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 
These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 
Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)
images: John Rakovan et al.

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder

Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.

by Bec Crew

So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 

These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 

Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)

images: John Rakovan et al.